Publications


A. BOOKS

2015. Force Multipliers: The Instrumentalities of Imperialism. (Edited volume). Montreal, QC: Alert Press

2014. Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism. (Edited volume). Montreal, QC: Alert Press.

2013. Emergency as Security: Liberal Empire at Home and Abroad. (Co-edited with Kyle McLoughlin). Montreal, QC: Alert Press.

2013. Who Is An Indian? Race, Place, and the Politics of Indigeneity in the Americas. (Edited volume). Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press.

2012. Slouching Towards Sirte: NATO's War on Libya and Africa. Montreal, QC: Baraka Books.

2011. Interventionism, Information Warfare, and the Military-Academic Complex. (Edited volume). Montreal, QC: Alert Press.

2010. Militarism, Humanism, and Occupation. (Edited volume). Montreal, QC: Alert Press.

2010. Indigenous Cosmopolitans: Transnational and Transcultural Indigeneity in the Twenty-First Century. (Edited volume). New York: Peter Lang Publishing.

2006. Indigenous Resurgence in the Contemporary Caribbean: Amerindian Survival and Revival. (Edited volume). New York: Peter Lang USA.

2005. Ruins of Absence, Presence of Caribs: (Post) Colonial Representations of Aboriginality in Trinidad and Tobago. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida.

1996. Against the Trinity: An Insurgent Imam Tells His Story (Religion, Politics, and Rebellion in Trinidad and Tobago). Binghamton, N.Y.: Ahead Publishing House.

SLOUCHING TOWARDS SIRTE WHO IS AN INDIAN? THE NEW IMPERIALISM VOL 3
GOOD INTENTIONS FORCE MULTIPLIERS  

Reviews of Slouching Towards Sirte: NATO's War on Libya and Africa:

Stephen Gowans speaking about Slouching Towards Sirte, on the Taylor Report:

Slouching Towards Sirte is a penetrating critique, not only of the NATO intervention in Libya, but of the concept of humanitarian intervention and imperialism in our time. It is the definitive treatment of NATO’s war on Libya. It is difficult to imagine it will be surpassed.” ~ Stephen Gowans, What’s Left (HTML) (mirror) (PDF) (PDF)

“very powerful and heart-breaking. I think it will be the definitive work on the subject.” ~ Daniel M. Kovalik

“Maximilian Forte challenges many of the prevailing notions, both of the left and right, about Libya and the reasons behind the NATO intervention there which toppled the government of Muammar Gaddafi….in these times in which we live, it is critical to be wary of any claims by the Western powers, especially the U.S., that they are going to war to protect human rights, for it is almost invariably the case that the war ends up violating more human rights than it protects. Indeed, human rights have sadly become the Trojan Horse the U.S. and its allies NGOs use to justify violent intervention into foreign lands. So, while the Trojan Horse story led to the famous maxim, “Beware of Greeks bearing gifts,” I would counsel the people of the poorer Global South, to “Beware of Westerners bearing human rights.” Certainly, Forte shows why this advice should be heeded.” ~ Daniel M. Kovalik, CounterPunch (HTML) (HTML Español) (PDF)

“…bold and incendiary…Forte doesn’t skimp on documentary evidence to make his case….A complex depiction of collusion and willful ignorance among NATO nations—and most especially, the United States—emerges….Forte’s allegations that NATO’s war was manufactured by liberal interventionists and 'iPad imperialists' whose agenda to disrupt African independence and execute regime change under the 'fig leaf' of saving lives are chilling—and persuasive. So too is the timeline of events between the start of the protests and the propagandist hysteria promulgated online….In this provocative and unabashedly direct book, Forte speaks truth to power.” ~ Amy O'Loughlin, ForeWord Reviews (HTML) (PDF)

“Forte, a Montreal based activist and anthropologist, provides a compelling counter-narrative to mainstream media accounts of the war on Libya and the overthrow and assassination of Muammar Gaddafi. Slouching Towards Sirte has an excellent analysis of the contradictions and paradoxes of Gaddafi’s pan-Africanism and Libyan anti-Black racism while arguing persuasively that regime change in Libya is but a preview of US strategy in Africa through AFRICOM.” ~ 10 Books for 2012, The Public Archive

“an ethnography of U.S. culture and the way it enabled and contributed to the destruction of Libya. It is also a meticulously documented study in hypocrisy: that of the U.S. elite, of the Gulf ruling classes who have lately welded their agenda directly onto that of the United States, and of the liberal bombardiers who emerged in the crucible of the 'humanitarian' wars of the 1990s only to reemerge as cheerleaders for the destruction of another Arab country in 2011. Finally, it is a study of the breakdown of the anti-war principles of leftists in the United States and Europe, so many of whom, for so long, sustained an infatuation with confused rebels whose leadership early on had their hand out to the U.S. empire…” ~ Max Ajl, The Monthly Review (April 2013, pp. 55-59) [also available here]

“Thoroughly researched and impeccably referenced, it tells the story of the real aims and real consequences of the war on Libya in its historical perspective. Its author, Maximilian Forte, is well placed to do so. A professor of social anthropology in Montreal, much of his writing and research in recent years has been dedicated to the new imperialism, and especially its ‘humanitarian’ cover. He was amongst the first to really expose violent racism within the Libyan insurrection, and its role in facilitating NATO’s goals in Africa, and has provided consistently excellent analyses of the media coverage surrounding the conflict….Forte’s book is a must-read for anyone seriously interested in understanding the motives and consequences of the West’s onslaught against Libya and African development.” ~ Dan Glazebrook, Ceasefire Magazine

“The anti-imperialist movement of the 20th century had Frantz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth. Today, we have Maximilian Forte’s Slouching Towards Sirte: NATO’s War on Libya and Africa.” ~ Donnchadh Mac an Ghoill

“In Slouching Towards Sirte, Maximilian Forte focuses on the terrible consequences of the U.S.-NATO onslaught in the town of Sirte, a Qaddafi stronghold which was nearly completely destroyed. Forte documents the use of indiscriminate firepower by rebels, the targeting of civilians and civilian rescuers, and abuses committed at checkpoints designed to control population movement…” ~ Jeremy Kuzmarov, J.P. Walker assistant professor of history, University of Tulsa, Z Communications

“…excellent book….As Forte writes with bitter irony, the propaganda surrounding the Libyan war demands 'vigilance and scepticism in the face of the heady claims of our own inherent goodness which can only find its highest expression in the form of aerial bombardment'. Alas, vigilance and scepticism are in short supply within the corporate media.” ~ David Edwards, Media Lens

“But the shine [of NATO's intervention] was, from the start, an illusion, as Maximilian Forte proves in his important new book, Slouching Towards Sirte. Forte thoroughly chronicles NATO’s bombing of Libya and the crimes against humanity for which NATO is responsible….Self-described humanitarians would do well to consider how their advocacy of the Libyan campaign not only caused extensive death and human rights violations but may prove to have helped usher in decades of more war in this continent.” ~ Greg Shupak, Jacobin

Slouching Towards Sirte is a scholarly and well-documented account that gives reader the impression that 'humanitarian missions' and the so-called 'Responsibility to Protect' are just an ideological facade and smokescreen used to mask the raw imposition of power and punishment on the nations whose leaders dare to oppose the "new world order" of liberal democracy…. Undoubtedly, the author…by publishing this book has laid the ground-work for critical anthropology. On the whole, the book is a powerful argument against the humanitarian myth promoted by western powers to mask the imposition of their dominance on other societies. Unfortunately, this fact is ignored by many, who ostrich-like prefer to put their heads in sand.” ~ Damir Mirkovic, Professor Emeritus, Brandon University

“The key facts? There was no “mass rape” ordered by Gadhafi, a claim repeated many times by Hillary Clinton (and eventually refuted by Amnesty International, the UN and even the U.S. Army). There was no bombing of protesters (a fact admitted to by the CIA’s Robert Gates). There was no plan for a “massacre” in Benghazi. Gadhafi offered amnesty to any insurgents who laid down their arms — in contrast the “no mercy” theme played by the Western powers. All of these facts are to be found in Slouching Towards Sirte: NATO’s War on Libya and Africa by Maximilian Forte.” ~ Murray Dobbin

“Maximilian Forte’s book on the Libyan war, Slouching Towards Sirte, is another powerful (and hence marginalized) study of the imperial powers in violent action, and with painful results, but supported by the UN, media, NGOs and a significant body of liberals and leftists who had persuaded themselves that this was a humanitarian enterprise. Forte shows compellingly that it wasn’t the least little bit humanitarian, either in the intent of its principals (the United States, France, and Great Britain) or in its results. As in the earlier cases of 'humanitarian intervention\ the Libyan program rested intellectually and ideologically on a set of supposedly justifying events and threats that were fabricated, selective, and/or otherwise misleading, but which were quickly institutionalized within the Western propaganda system.” ~ Edward S. Herman
 

Reviews of Ruins of Absence, Presence of Caribs:

1. BETH CONKLIN (Vanderbilt University)
2. JAMES CARRIER (Social Anthropology)
3. PETER HULME (Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute)
4. NEIL L. WHITEHEAD (New West Indian Guide)
5. GERARD COLLOMB (Journal of Latin American Anthropology)
6. CARIBBEAN REVIEW OF BOOKS
7. HEATHER A. HORST (Anthropology News)
8. JACOB CAMPBELL (Transforming Anthropology)
9. JOSEPH O. PALACIO (Journal of Eastern Caribbean Studies)

Comments on Indigenous Resurgence in the Contemporary Caribbean:

1. PETER HULME (University of Essex)
2. HELEN HORNBECK TANNER (D'Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian History)

Comments on Indigenous Cosmopolitans:

1. Thomas Hylland Eriksen (University of Oslo)
2. Jeffrey Sissons (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand)


B. CHAPTERS IN EDITED VOLUMES

2015. “Force Multipliers: Imperial Instrumentalism in Theory and Practice.” In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), Force Multipliers: The Instrumentalities of Imperialism (pp. 1-87). Montreal, QC: Alert Press.

2015. “On Secrecy, Power, and the Imperial State: Perspectives from WikiLeaks and Anthropology.” In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), Force Multipliers: The Instrumentalities of Imperialism (pp. 187-221). Montreal, QC: Alert Press.

2014. “Introduction: Imperial Abduction Lore and Humanitarian Seduction.” In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism (pp. 1-34). Montreal, QC: Alert Press.

2014. “A Flickr of Militarization: Photographic Regulation, Symbolic Consecration, and the Strategic Communication of ‘Good Intentions’.” In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism (pp. 185-279). Montreal, QC: Alert Press.

2013. “Anthropology against Empire: Demilitarizing the Discipline in North America”. In Maximilian C. Forte and Kyle McLoughlin (Eds.), Emergency as Security: Liberal Empire at Home and Abroad (pp. 169-189). Montreal, QC: Alert Press.

2013. with Kyle McLoughlin, “Introduction: Emergency as Security: The Liberal Empire at Home and Abroad”. In Maximilian C. Forte and Kyle McLoughlin (Eds.), Emergency as Security: Liberal Empire at Home and Abroad (pp. 1-19). Montreal, QC: Alert Press.

2013. “Introduction: 'Who Is an Indian?' The Cultural Politics of a Bad Question”. In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), Who Is An Indian? Race, Place, and the Politics of Indigeneity in the Americas. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press. Pps. 3-51.

2013. “Carib Identity, Racial Politics, and the Problem of Indigenous Recognition in Trinidad and Tobago”. In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), Who Is An Indian? Race, Place, and the Politics of Indigeneity in the Americas. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press. Pps. 172-193.

2013. “Conclusion: Seeing Beyond the State and Thinking beyond the State of Sight”. In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), Who Is An Indian? Race, Place, and the Politics of Indigeneity in the Americas. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press. Pps. 234-241

2013. “Preface”. In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), Who Is An Indian? Race, Place, and the Politics of Indigeneity in the Americas. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press. Pps. vii-ix.

2012.  “Top Ten Myths in the War on Libya”. In Jeffrey St. Clair and Joshua Frank, eds., Hopeless: Barack Obama and the Politics of Illusion. Oakland, CA: AK Press. Pps. 249-264.

2012.   إعادة اختراع الويكيليكس المستمرة الإعلام والسلطة وتبديل شكل الاحتجاج ماآسيمليان فورت (“The Ongoing Reinvention of Wikileaks: Media, Power, and Shifting the Shape of Dissent”). In, WikiLeaks, Media and Politics: Between the Virtual and the Real, by the Arab Center for Research and Policy Studies.

2011. “Preface” In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), The New Imperialism, Vol. 2: Interventionism, Information Warfare, and the Military-Academic Complex (pp. xi-xii). Montreal, QC: Alert Press.

2011. “Introduction: Intervention, Information, Ideologies, and Industry: The New Imperialism and its Refractions.” In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), The New Imperialism, Vol. 2: Interventionism, Information Warfare, and the Military-Academic Complex (pp. 1-14). Montreal, QC: Alert Press.

2011. “Demons, Angels, and the Messiah: The Top Ten Myths in the War against Libya” In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), The New Imperialism, Vol. 2: Interventionism, Information Warfare, and the Military-Academic Complex (pp. 145-195). Montreal, QC: Alert Press.

2010. “Introduction: The 'New' Imperialism of Militarization, Humanitarianism, and Occupation.” In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), The New Imperialism, Vol. 1: Militarism, Humanism, and Occupation (pp. 1-29). Montreal, QC: Alert Press.

2010. “Introduction: Indigeneities and Cosmopolitanisms.” In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), Indigenous Cosmopolitans: Transnational and Transcultural Indigeneity in the Twenty-First Century (pp. 1-16).. New York: Peter Lang Publishing.

2010. “A Carib Canoe, Circling in the Culture of the Open Sea: Submarine Currents Connecting Multiple Indigenous Shores.” In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), Indigenous Cosmopolitans: Transnational and Transcultural Indigeneity in the Twenty-First Century (pp. 17-37). New York: Peter Lang Publishing.

2006. “Amerindian@Caribbean: The Modes and Meanings of 'Electronic Solidarity' in the Revival of Carib and Taino Identities." In Kyra Marie Landzelius (Ed.), Native on the Net: Indigenous and Diasporic Peoples in the Virtual Age (pp. 132-151).  London: Routledge.

2006. Lead writer, with Ricardo Bharath Hernandez: “ ‘In This Place Where I Was Chief’: History and Ritual in the Maintenance and Retrieval of Traditions in the Santa Rosa Carib Community of Arima, Trinidad”. In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), Indigenous Resurgence in the Contemporary Caribbean: Amerindian Survival and Revival (pp. 107-131). New York: Peter Lang.

2006. “Searching for a Centre in the Digital Ether: Notes on the Indigenous Caribbean Resurgence on the Internet”. In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), Indigenous Resurgence in the Contemporary Caribbean: Amerindian Survival and Revival (pp. 253-269). New York: Peter Lang.

2006. “Introduction: The Dual Absences of Extinction and Marginality: What Difference Does an Indigenous Presence Make?” In Maximilian C. Forte (Ed.), Indigenous Resurgence in the Contemporary Caribbean: Amerindian Survival and Revival (pp. 1-17). New York: Peter Lang.

2005. “Centering the Links: Understanding Cybernetic Patterns of Co-production, Circulation and Consumption.” In Christine Hine (Ed.), Virtual Methods: Issues in Social Research on the Internet (pp. 93-106). Oxford: Berg.

2004. “Co-Construction and Field Creation: Website Development as both an Instrument and Relationship in Action Research.” In Elizabeth Buchanan (Ed.), Virtual Research Ethics: Issues and Controversies (pp. 222-248). Hershey, PA: Idea Group.


C. ARTICLES IN JOURNALS AND ANNUALS

2014. “Anthropology: The Empire on which the Sun Never Sets.” Anthropological Forum: A Journal of Social Anthropology and Comparative Sociology, 24(2), 197-218.

2013. “Secret from Whom?” (The Big Question: What Should Governments Keep Secret?). World Policy Journal, 30(3), September, 4-5.

2011. “The Human Terrain System and Anthropology: A Review of Ongoing Public Debates.” American Anthropologist, 113(1), March, 149-153.

2008. “Interview with St. Croix Artist Roy Lawaetz on his Modular Triangular System and the Taino Zemi.” The Caribbean Writer, 22, 195-209

2006. “Report on the Carib Community of Trinidad and Tobago.” In Sille Stidsen (Ed.), The Indigenous World (pp. 131-136). Copenhagen: IWGIA.

2006. “Extinction: Ideologies Against Indigeneity in the Caribbean.” The Southern Quarterly, 43 (4), Summer: 46-69.

2006. “The Political Economy of Tradition: Sponsoring and Incorporating the Caribs of Trinidad and Tobago”. Research in Economic Anthropology, 24, 329-358.

2004. “Report on the Carib Community of Trinidad and Tobago.” In Diana Vindig (Ed.), The Indigenous World (pp. 114-118). Copenhagen: IWGIA

2004. “Long-Term Field Research in Anthropology.” Historical Social Research (Historische Sozialforschung), 29 (2), 133-141.

2003. “Caribbean Aboriginals Online: Digitized Culture, Networked Representation.” Indigenous Affairs: Special Issue on Indigenous Peoples and Information Technology, (2), 32-37.

2003. “Report on the Carib Community of Trinidad and Tobago: History, Politics, Legislation.” In Diana Vindig (Ed.), The Indigenous World (pp. 106-109). Copenhagen: IWGIA.

2002. “‘We are not Extinct’: The Revival of Carib and Taino Identities, the Internet, and the Transformation of Offline Indigenes into Online ‘N-digenes’.” Sincronía: An Electronic Journal of Cultural Studies (Department of Letters, University of Guadalajara, Mexico). Spring.
(http://sincronia.cucsh.udg.mx/CyberIndigen.htm)

2000. “The Contemporary Context of Carib ‘Revival’ in Trinidad and Tobago: Creolization, Developmentalism and the State.” KACIKE: Journal of Caribbean Amerindian History and Anthropology, 1 (1): 18-33. (http://web.archive.org/web/20081202053224/http://www.kacike.org/MaxForte.html)

1999. “Reviving Caribs: Recognition, Patronage and Ceremonial Indigeneity in Trinidad and Tobago.” Cultural Survival Quarterly, 23 (4), Winter: 35-41.

1998. “Globalization and World-Systems Analysis: Toward New Paradigms of a Geo-Historical Social Anthropology (A Research Review).” Review (Journal of the Fernand Braudel Center for the Study of Economies, Historical Systems and Civilizations), 21 (1), 9-99.

1995. “The Crisis in Creolization in Trinidad and Tobago? Globalized Revitalizations, Systemic Ethno-Politics, and Alter-Nationalisms.” The International Third World Studies Journal and Review, 7, October, 41-54.

Not Peer Reviewed (for more, please click on the REPORTS tab):

2005. “Extinction: The Historical Trope of Anti-Indigeneity in the Caribbean.” Issues in Caribbean Amerindian Studies, Vol. 6, Aug. 2004–Aug. 2005.
Caribbean Amerindian Centrelink—http://www.centrelink.org/forteatlantic2004.pdf

2002. “ ‘Our Amerindian Ancestors’: The State, the Nation, and the Revaluing of Indigeneity in Trinidad and Tobago.” Issues in Caribbean Amerindian Studies, Vol. 1, Feb. 2001–Feb. 2002.
Caribbean Amerindian Centrelink— http://www.centrelink.org/Forte.html

1999. “From Smoke Ceremonies to Cyberspace: Globalized Indigeneity, Multi-Sited Research and the Internet.” Issues in Caribbean Amerindian Studies, Vol. 1, Sep. 1998 – Sep. 1999.
Caribbean Amerindian Centrelink — http://www.centrelink.org/Internet.html

1998. “The International Indigene: Regional and Global Integration of Amerindian Communities in the Caribbean.” Issues in Caribbean Amerindian Studies, Vol. 1, Sep. 1998 – Sep. 1999.
Caribbean Amerindian Centrelink — http://www.centrelink.org/II.html

1998. “Renewed Indigeneity in the Local-Global Continuum and the Political Economy of Tradition Among Modern West Indian Caribs.” Issues in Caribbean Amerindian Studies Vol. 1, Sep. 1998–Sep.


D. ENCYCLOPEDIA ENTRIES

2015. “AFRICOM, NATO and the 2011 War on Libya.” In Immanuel Ness & Saer Maty Ba (Eds.), The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism (pp. 250-267). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

2015. “Gaddafi, Muammar.” In Richard C. Martin (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Islam and the Muslim World, 2nd edition (pp. 391-392). Farmington Hills, MI: Cengage Learning/Macmillan Reference—USA.

2015. Jama’at al-Muslimeen. In Richard C. Martin (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Islam and the Muslim World, 2nd edition (p. 636). Farmington Hills, MI: Cengage Learning/Macmillan Reference—USA.

2015. “Human Terrain System (United States): Critique.” In James D. Wright (Ed.), International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, 2nd edition, Vol. 11 (pp. 392–399). Oxford: Elsevier.

2011. “Carib Slavery—Spanish Colonial Control over Caribbean Labor.” In Alexander Mikaberidze, Dane A. Morrison, Jeffrey M. Diamond, D. Harland Hagler (Eds.), World History Encyclopedia, Era 6: The First Global Age, 1450–1770 (pp. 145-146). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

2011. “The Caribbean and Postcolonialism.” In Andrew J Waskey, Fred R. Nadis (Eds.), World History Encyclopedia, Era 9: Promises and Paradoxes, 1945-Present (pp. 354-355). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

2011. “Indigenous People of the Caribbean since 1945.” In Andrew J Waskey, Fred R. Nadis (Eds.), World History Encyclopedia, Era 9: Promises and Paradoxes, 1945-Present (pp. 389-391). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

2007. “Ethnography.” International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, 2nd ed. Farmington Hills, MI: Macmillan Reference USA, 99-101.

2005. “Website Development as Both an Instrument and Relationship in Action Research.” In Stewart Marshall, Wal Taylor, Xinghuo Yu (Eds.), The Encyclopedia of Developing Regional Communities with Information and Communication Technology (pp. 729-734). Hershey, PA: Idea Group Reference.


E. CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS and WORKING PAPERS

2011. “The Ongoing Reinvention of Wikileaks: Media, Power, and Shifting the Shape of Dissent.” Included as a chapter in the publication in Arabic of a book, WikiLeaks, Media and Politics: Between the Virtual and the Real, by the Arab Center for Research and Policy Studies.

1999. “Renewed Indigeneity in the Local-Global Continuum and the Political Economy of Tradition among Modern West Indian Caribs.” In R.K. Oden (Ed.), Visioning the 21st Century: Globalization, Transformation and Opportunity. Proceedings of the 24th Annual Third World Conference. Chicago: TWCF/Governors State University. (see also: http://web.archive.org/web/20070722195808/http://twcfinternational.org/24proceedings.html)


F. BOOK REVIEWS & REVIEW ESSAYS

2014. Review of: Yurumein (Homeland)—Resistance, Rupture & Repair: The story of the Caribs of St. Vincent in the Caribbean. For H-Caribbean.

2007. Review of San Miguel, Pedro L. The Imagined Island: History, Identity, and Utopia in Hispaniola. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press. For the Hispanic American Historical Review, 87 (3), 2007, 596-598.

2006. Review of Lawrence, Bonita. “Real” Indians and Others: Mixed-Blood Urban Native Peoples and Indigenous Nationhood. Vancouver: UBC Press. For the Canadian Review of Sociology. July.
http://www.csa-scs.ca/files/www/documents/crs/reviews/archives/html/200607LAWRENCE.html

2006. Review of Postero, Nancy Grey and Zamosc, Leon, eds. The Struggle for Indigenous Rights in Latin America. Brighton and Portland: Sussex Academic Press, 2005. For the Journal of Latin American Anthropology, 11 (1), April, 208-210.

2006. Review of Baker, David P., and Gerald K. LeTendre, National Differences, Global Similarities: World Culture and the Future of Schooling. Palo Alto, California: Stanford University Press, 2005. For Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 37 (4), March. [online]

2005. Review of Suarez-Orozco, Marcelo M., and Desiree Baolian Qin-Hilliard, eds. Globalization: Culture and Education in the New Millennium. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004. For Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 36 (4), December. [online]

2004. Review of De Barros, Juanita. Order and Place in a Colonial City: Patterns of Struggle and Resistance in Georgetown, British Guiana, 1889-1924. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press. 2002. For the Canadian Review of Sociology. See:
http://www.csa-scs.ca/files/www/documents/crs/reviews/archives/html/200408DEBARROS.html

2004. Review of Avatara, (a “virtual ethnographic” film). In Visual Studies, 19 (1), 116-118.

2003. Review of Lal Balkaran (2002) Dictionary of the Guyanese Amerindians and other South American Native Terms: An A-Z Guide To Their Anthropology, Cosmology, Culture, Exploration, History, Geography, Legend, Folklore and Myth. In Kacike: The Journal of Caribbean Amerindian History and Anthropology [Online Journal]. Available at: http://web.archive.org/web/20081101153641/http://www.kacike.org/BalkaranReview.html

2002. Is it Real? Problems and Prospects of Research in "the Real World." Review Essay: Colin Robson (2002). Real World Research. A Resource for Social Scientists and Practitioner-Researchers. (Second Edition) [42 paragraphs]. Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research [Online Journal], 3(4). Available at: http://www.qualitative-research.net/index.php/fqs/article/view/796/1728

2002. Review of Capturing Globalization, Edited by James Mittelman and Norani Othman. The Asia-Pacific Journal of Anthropology, 3 (1) April, 148-150.

1999. Review of Taíno Revival: Critical Perspectives on Puerto Rican Identity and Cultural Politics Edited by Gabriel Haslip-Viera. Plantation Society and Culture, 6 (2-3) Fall, 327-330.


G. NEWSLETTERS

2008. “Militarizing Anthropology, Researching for Empire, and the Implications for Canada.” Culture (CASCA Newsletter), 2 (2), Fall, 6-10.
http://www.box.net/shared/qhaxycs7x0

2002. “Another Revolution Missed? Anthropology and Cyberspace.” Anthropology News, 43 (9), December, 20-21

2000. “Anthropology Uncanned.” Anthropology News, 41 (3), March, 9-10

1999. “Trinidad’s Caribs and the Globalization of Caribbean Aboriginality.” Boletín Informativo de la Nación Taína de las Antillas, 7 (2), March-April, 1-3.
 

H. MEDIA PUBLICATIONS

2015. “Democracy in Cuba and at Home.” CounterPunch, January 9.
http://www.counterpunch.org/2015/01/09/democracy-in-cuba-and-at-home/

2013. “Thirty Years After the U.S. Invasion of Grenada, the First Neoliberal War.” Centre for Global Research, October 28.
http://www.globalresearch.ca/thirty-years-after-the-u-s-invasion-of-grenada-the-first-neoliberal-war/5355916

2013. “The Great Nothingness of Libya, Two Years After Muammar Gaddafi.” Centre for Global Research, October 21.
http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-great-nothingness-of-libya-two-years-after-muammar-gaddafi/5355028

2013. “Syria’s Chemical Weapons and UN Security Council Resolution 2118: Reality, Resolutions, Representations.” Centre for Global Research, September 30.
http://www.globalresearch.ca/on-un-security-council-resolution-2118-and-syria-reality-resolutions-representations/5352247

2013. “Deflating Empire: The Syrian Threat to the United States.” Centre for Global Research, September 10.
http://www.globalresearch.ca/deflating-empire-the-syrian-threat-to-the-united-states/5349146

2013. “Bradley Manning and the Meaning of Bravery.” Centre for Global Research, July 31.
http://www.globalresearch.ca/bradley-manning-and-the-meaning-of-bravery/5344489

2013. “Getting It Right: Hugo Chávez and the 'Arab Spring'.” Global Research, 16 April.
http://www.globalresearch.ca/getting-it-right-hugo-chavez-and-the-arab-spring/5331637

2013. “Thoughtful, Respectful, and Progressive? Regarding the 'Responsibility to Protect'.” Global Research, 25 February.
http://www.globalresearch.ca/thoughtful-respectful-and-progressive-regarding-the-responsibility-to-protect/5324311

2013. “The New Libya: The Second Anniversary of What?” CounterPunch, 19 February.
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/02/19/the-new-libya-2/

2012. “The Effects of Diplomacy as Subversion: The State Department’s 'Report' on the Attack in Benghazi.” CounterPunch, 20 December 20.
http://www.counterpunch.org/2012/12/20/the-effects-of-diplomacy-as-subversion/

2012. “A War for Human Rights?” The Political Bouillon, 8 December 8.
http://thepoliticalbouillon.com/en/a-war-for-human-rights/

2012. “The Other Moral Squalor of U.S. Militarism.” Global Research, 28 November.
http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-other-moral-squalor-of-u-s-militarism/5313338

2011. “Al Jazeera and U.S. Foreign Policy: What WikiLeaks’ U.S. Embassy Cables Reveal about U.S. Pressure and Propaganda.” Monthly Review (MRzine), 22 September.
http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/2011/forte220911.html

2011. “The Top Ten Myths in the War Against Libya.” CounterPunch, 31 August.
http://www.counterpunch.org/2011/08/31/the-top-ten-myths-in-the-war-against-libya/print

2011. “Libya–Lather, Rinse, Repeat–Syria: Liberal Imperialism and the Refusal to Learn.” Monthly Review (MRzine), 10 August.
http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/2011/forte100811.html

2011. “The War in Libya: Race, ‘Humanitarianism,’ and the Media.” Monthly Review (MRzine), 11 April.
http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/2011/forte200411.html

2011. “The Clinton doctrine: US reaction to events unfolding in the Arab world reveals the emergence of more insidious approach.” Al Jazeera English, February 22.
http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/opinion/2011/02/2011222101415541965.html

2011. مصر والإمبراطورية الأميركية (“Egypt and the American Empire”). Al Jazeera Arabic, February 16.
http://www.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/DE3E9AEB-244D-4FDD-A7BC-8BFA94BF6FFC.htm

2010. 08 August: نواقص في تسريبات ويكيليكس (published as part of my monthly columns for Al Jazeera).
http://www.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/0EF2F48C-E872-488B-82EE-DED5D67DBE90.htm?GoogleStatID=1

2010. 02 August: “Reason for Celebration, Cause for Concern: The Wikileaks Afghan War Diary,” CounterPunch (reprinted by Alternet as “7 Reasons Why We Should Celebrate Wikileaks, and 8 Reasons It’s Not the Panacea Some Are Calling It”)
http://counterpunch.org/forte08022010.html
http://www.alternet.org/story/147722/7_reasons_why_we_should_celebrate_wikileaks,_and_8_reasons_it%27s_not_the_panacea_some_are_calling_it/?page=entire
 
2010. 11 August: “Unhinged at the US State Department and Pentagon: A War on Wikileaks?” CounterPunch (also republished on Mathaba — also translated into Spanish, appearing on Spain’s Rebelión, “¿Guerra contra Wikileaks? Desquiciados en el Departamento de Estado y el Pentágono;” and the latter became the basis for this article in the Venezuelan newspaper, Correo del Orinoco, “EEUU amenaza a los soldados que busquen consultar los documentos – El Pentágono pretende callar a Wikileaks”)
http://counterpunch.com/forte08112010.html
http://www.mathaba.net/news/?x=624277
http://www.rebelion.org/noticia.php?id=111387&titular=%BFguerra-contra-%3Ci%3Ewikileaks%3C/i%3E?-
http://www.correodelorinoco.gob.ve/tema-dia/pentagono-pretende-callar-a-wikileaks/
 

About Maximilian Forte

Anthropologist focusing on imperialism, neoliberalism, militarization, "humanitarian intervention," decolonization, Indigenous movements, and other topics in Political Anthropology. In addition, he teaches courses on visual anthropology, media ethnographies, and cultural imperialism. He is a full Professor in the Dept. of Sociology & Anthropology at Concordia University in Montreal. Please direct comments and inquiries to maximilian.forte@concordia.ca